It was not an easy win for them but Canterbury travelled east to Allianz Stadium to resist a fight back from an inspired Roosters outfit, 24-20.

Bulldogs slip in to top four

In light of the Broncos’ loss to the Storm, Cantebury find themselves in fourth position, equal points with the third placed Cowboys and the Eels in fifth – while Parramatta still have a game in hand, their points are expected to be docked soon – the Cowboys on the other hand are the red hot favourites to beat South Sydney – and if the Cowboys lose by 70, Canterbury find themselves in third. While that isn’t too likely, it is a great position to be in considering issues in consistency Canterbury have faced this year.

Canterbury Pearced

One positive for the Roosters on Thursday was Mitchell Pearce returning to the form he is known for and earned Origin jerseys for. He shined in an otherwise mediocre Roosters backline, causing more than a few problems for a Bulldogs outfit lacking in intensity for certain phases of the game. It’s unlikely that they make the finals, but everything’s a building block for next year in Bondi.

Short turnarounds again in focus

One explanation for the lack of intensity in the Bulldogs is, as many have waxed lyrical about through most of the year, short turnarounds. For them, it was a five day turnaround from playing Brisbane at ANZ – The Roosters were fresh from the bye. Josh Jackson and David Klemmer were on the field for their third game in eight days. Impact players in Sam Kasiano were used more sparingly than in previous games, another consequence of the short turnaround.

Who gets the Try?

Josh Jackson was ruled to have scored after Michael Lichaa helped him get the ball down in a try more reminiscent of Union than League – though it was legal, it was an ugly one – but there was some conjecture over who scored the try. The records now show Jackson can claim it as his, but if it weren’t for Lichaa’s downward force the ball wouldn’t have been grounded; shame that the stats won’t say two points to each.